SEMI-ANNUAL SEMINAR (Fall 1957)
CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF CRIMINALISTS
October 18-19, 1957
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA

EVALUATION OF BLOOD ALCOHOL TEST PROJECT DATA
A.A. Biasotti

Data of past projects was discussed, and mathematical and statistical analysis demonstrated how the standard results of one laboratory in the test series can give a false impression of the probable errors of the total set of data. By removing the reported data of one laboratory, the expected error by calculation for the remainder was cut down considerably. Data sheets were handed out by Mr. Biasotti.

It was decided by the group that a +/- .005% deviation at the .20% level would be considered as an acceptable reproducibility for consecutive duplicates on a group study basis.

The Orange County Laboratory volunteered to send another sample to all laboratories, including non-member laboratories requesting.

Biasotti will circulate a questionnaire on methods in use at the present time.


A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTOXIMETER
Ray Pinker

A report was made of the results of the project in which duplicate Intoximeters were analyzed by two separate laboratories, with a third laboratory analyzing a blood specimen on the same subject. It was shown that the blood test did not agree with the Intoximeter test, and the following observations were recorded:

INTOXIMETER STUDY
(Correlation with Blood Sample Alcohol)
INTOXIMETER STUDY
(Comparison of two Intoximeter units taken from same subject
at same time and analyzed by two different laboratories)
Lab A Lab B
Frequency Divergence Frequency Divergence Frequency
3 .00 0 .00 0
2 .01 2 .01 1
3 .02 1 .02 0
4 .03 2 .03 1
1 .04 1 .04 3
1 .05 5 .05 2
0 .06 2 .06 2
1 .07 1 .07 2
0 .08 1 .08 1
1 .09 2 .09 3
Range +.07 to -.09 = .16 2 .10 0
μ = .033 0 .11 0
σ = .037 1 .12 3
0 .13 0
1 .14 0
.14 0
.15 0
.16 1
μ = .062 μ = .068
σ = .071 σ = .061
Range + .01 to -.16 = .17
σ = -.078

Informal information received from Glen C. Forester, of the Intoximeter Association, indicates his recommendation to discontinue the use of these instruments until the source of the trouble is located.


AN ENZYME METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION OF BLOOD ALCOHOL
Paul L. Kirk

The method involves the use of alcohol dehydrogenase plus Co-Enzyme I. A special flask is used which is available from the Microchemical Specialties Company, into which is introduced 10 μl of blood directly to a filter paper. Diffusion then occurs, and the alcohol plus oxidized Co-Enzyme I (10 mg per ml) react in the presence of alcohol dehydrogenase (1 mg per ml) at a pH of 8.8 to 9.0, to give reduced Co-Enzyme I plus acetaldehyde. The total amount of alcohol present is measured by measuring the amount of reduced Co-Enzyme which has a maximum absorbance at 340 millimicrons. The buffer composition and solutions data may be obtained in reprint from Dr. Kirk.


A SUCTION AIR DRAFT EVALUATION OF THE KOZELKA-HINE DISTILLATION METHOD
Paul L. Kirk

Demonstration and discussion resulted in the following statements of disadvantages and advantages:

Disadvantages
1. Inlet air is not scrubbed
2. Between-sample washing of apparatus is troublesome
3. Transfer of distillate from receiver is required for further analysis
4. Distilling time is 20 to 30 minutes

Advantages
1. The apparatus is compact
2. There is no heat or steam evolved from the process comparable to the usual Kozelka-Hine method
3. Simplicity of use and ease of learning by students


CHEMICAL CHANGES OF GLUCOSE TO ALCOHOL IN BLOOD SAMPLES
Ronald Briglia

The principal points of discussion were that changes can occur if there is no enzyme poison present.


AIDS FOR THE ANALYST
Allan E. Gilmore

Photographs were shown of a micro flash point apparatus and an arson solvent recovery still using an electric mantle. The use of these pieces of apparatus was briefly discussed.


EXTRACTION PROCESS FOR TOXICOLOGY SAMPLES
Paul L. Kirk

A simple piece of glass apparatus was demonstrated which involves the placement of a toxicology sample on top of a layer of chloroform, or 50% chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. An inside tube then dips into the chloroform and in this cell there is placed either a basic or acid solution. The chloroform layer is stirred with a magnetic stirrer and organic materials of toxicologic interest then pass from the sample to the chloroform layer, thence to the acid or base medium. This streamlined Stas-Otto process lends itself to the recovery of purified components in a simplified manner.


A MICRO ELECTRONIC CHROMATOGRAPHIC APPARATUS
Paul L. Kirk

This device, known as a Kirk-Karler unit, uses Whatman #11 paper and operates at approximately 300 volts. Demonstrations were made with 3-component ink and with blood stains. "A" and "B" agglutinogens can be separated from interfering contaminants end collected by this process.