SEMI-ANNUAL SEMINAR (Fall 1956)
CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF CRIMINALISTS
October 19-20, 1956
RICHMOND, CALIFORNIA

REPORT OF BLOOD ALCOHOL STANDARD SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION
Jack Cadman, Orange County Sheriff's Office, Santa Ana, Ca.

The results of two circulated samples were very gratifying, indicating a substantial improvement of precision and accuracy since the first set of samples was distributed. It was decided to continue with the circulation of standard samples and attempt to work out some form of accreditation. It was decided that standard samples would be distributed by laboratories indicated on the following dates:

Laboratory Date
Orange County Sheriff's Office January 15, 1957
C.I. &.I. Laboratory March 15, 1957
San Jose Laboratory of Criminalistics May 15, 1957

It was agreed that the analysis must be completed and results returned within two weeks after receipt of samples.


THE USE OF MOSQUITO FISH (GAMBUSIA AFFINIS) AS A METHOD FOR SCREENING TOXICOLOGICAL CASES
Jack Cadman, Orange County Sheriff's Office, Santa Ana, Ca.

It was pointed out that a number of drugs and poisons of toxicological interest showed toxicity when the concentration was 15 mg per 15 ml, or greater. The test can be done using micro amounts in extremely small immersion vessels.


TECHNIQUES EMPLOYED IN PROBLEMS INVOLVING BLOOD
Jack Cadman

This discussion took the form of inquiry into what the various laboratories are doing in connection with various stages of blood testing in the following matters:

1. Recording blood stain patterns
2. Takayama tests on gamma quantities by using a cover slip instead of a micro slide
3. Agglutinins
4. Agglutionogens

It was pointed out that animal anti sera are available from Dr. Campbell, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, and the Fish and Game Commission, Sacramento, California. (As regarding the latter, requests should be directed through the C. I. & I. laboratory.)


FINGERNAILS AS EVIDENCE
Don Harding, Pasadena Police Department

The possibility of individual identity from fingernail cuts was discussed. The identification potential is based on longitudinal ridge striations in fingernails.


REAGENT IMPURITIES IN PHOSPHATASE TESTS
Ray Pinker, Crime Investigation Laboratory, Los Angeles Police Department

Various impurities which have been found in reagents for the acid phosphatase test were discussed. It was pointed out that free naphthal results from sodium alpha naphthal acid phosphate by hydrolysis on standing, which contaminates the test. Likewise, it has been found that the anthraquinone-1-diazonium chloride substance is heavily loaded with an unknown impurity. It was pointed out that the naphthal can be removed by an ether wash of the salt. If it is desired to prepare the diazonium compound in pure form, a method can be found in the NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, Vol. 242, pp. 110-111, Jan. 19, 1950. A discussion of this matter can also be found in the JOURNAL OF CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL LAW AND POLICE SCIENCE, Vol. 40, p. 813, 1950. X-ray diffraction analysis determines the presence of a large amount of impurity in the substrate material.


RESULTS OF CRITICAL TESTS ON THE BREATHALYZER
Lowell W. Bradford, Laboratory of Criminalistics, Office of District Attorney, San Jose, Ca.

Forty-seven tests were made using the Breathalyzer end direct blood tests simultaneously. Following are the results:

Deviation No. of Deviations
.00 5
.01 11
.02 8
.03 10
.04 6
.05 1
.06 2
.07 4
.08 1
.09 0
.10 1

The inventor of the instrument has since made some design changes which may remedy the lack of precision. Another test series is expected after the first of the year, when an instrument is promised for experimentation.


COMPARATIVE SOIL DENSITY SEDIMENTATION TESTS
David Q. Burd, State Bureau of CII, Sacramento

The lack of information concerning uniform results of soil tests throughout the state was discussed. It was decided that a standard data method would be useful. Photographs under standard conditions were agreed to be the best method of collecting these data.


MAGNESIUM SMOKE AND TOOL MARKS
David Q. Burd

The smoke technique was discussed and photographs of the improved results were demonstrated.


INDIVIDUALIZATION OF BARBITURATES
James W. Brackett, Jr., Laboratory of Criminalistics, Office of the District Attorney, San Jose.

It was pointed out that ethylene dichloride is a useful solvent for chromatographing barbiturates. A novel feature of reading the chromatograms involved the making of a photographic print by the contact process. The chromatogram itself was used as a negative, and the light source was a mineralite of the short wave length type and a liquid filter of the following composition:

Quantity Chemical
2.5 mg p-Nitrophenol
42 g NiSO4·6H2O
30 g CoSO4·7H2O

This solution was contained in a beaker with a bottom of polyethylene film .002" thick. The UV light was passed through the solution from the top, the filtered light emerging from the bottom.

One to ten gammas of barbiturate on the chromatogram could be detected by this photographic technique.


PROCESSING ANSCOCHROME WITH ANSCO COLOR FILM KITS AND PRINTON KIT
Ray Pinker, Los Angeles

Data for a variety of film speeds and ages of film were given. This information can be obtained from the Los Angeles Police Department Criminalistics Laboratory upon request.


TECHNICAL NOTE:

Mention was made of the INTERNATIONAL CRIMINOLOGY AND POLICE REVIEW as a medium for technical information. It is published by the International Criminology and Police Commission, General Secretariat, 37 bis Rue Paul Valéry, Paris 16e, France.